When:
November 2, 2017 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
2017-11-02T18:30:00-04:00
2017-11-02T19:30:00-04:00
Where:
Rogow Room
212 S Gaston St
Brevard NC 28712
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Marcy Thompson
828-884-1820
Discover Natural Transylvania @ Rogow Room | Brevard | North Carolina | United States

Discover Natural Transylvania is a monthly program series at the Transylvania County Library exploring the place where we live, work, and play.  Presenters include experts in the fields of ecology, biology, geology, flora, fauna, outdoor recreation, and more.   The programs are on the first Thursday evening of most months at 6:30 pm in the Rogow Room.  Each program lasts approximately one hour.  Light refreshments are provided.  These free programs are supported by the Friends of the Library.

Thursday, December 6 — “Going Batty: Bat Conservation in N.C.” with Katherine Caldwell, Wildlife Diversity Biologist
Learn about bat basics, conservation issues, NCWRC projects, and what you can do for bats with Wildlife Biologist Katherine Caldwell.
Caldwell received her undergraduate in Ecology and Environmental Biology from UNC-A and a Masters in Biology from Ball State University.  She has studied bats for 8 years.

Thursday, January 3 — “Peregrine Falcons & Golden Eagles” with Christine Kelly, Mountain Wildlife Diversity Biologist
     Have you ever seen a golden eagle in North Carolina? A recent camera trap study by North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission revealed that golden eagles are wintering in western North Carolina in greater numbers than previously thought. A concurrent GPS telemetry study provided insight on winter habitat use and clues as to why these large raptors are so rarely seen. Unlike their counterpart found soaring over open lands in the western United States, our golden eagles in the eastern US frequent heavily forested areas, often in remote mountains. Come learn about how and where we documented golden eagles in 16 counties.
The recovery of the peregrine falcon is one of our country’s greatest conservation success stories. In North Carolina, the species was absent for over two decades and was then re-established via a reintroduction effort. By 1999, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service deemed the species recovered and removed it from the list of threatened and endangered species. But how has the peregrine fared since then?
Chris Kelly is a Mountain Wildlife Diversity Biologist for North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. She oversees western region bird and Carolina northern flying squirrel conservation for NCWRC since 2005.

Thursday, February 7 — “Mountain Weather” with Jared Rennie, Research Meteorologist
      Did you know the wettest (Lake Toxaway) and driest (Asheville) parts of North Carolina are only 50 miles apart? Why is this the case, and why should people in Western North Carolina care? These types of questions are being answered by meteorologists who live in Western North Carolina. Their job is not to give a 7-day forecast, but rather look back in time and try to analyze trends in weather information. Join meteorologist, Jared Rennie to learn more about this process.
Rennie is a Certified Consulting Meteorologist at the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies (NCICS), in Asheville, North Carolina. He works inside NOAAs National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), who are tasked with archiving all the world’s weather and climate data right here in Western North Carolina.

Thursday, March 7 — “The Skunks of North Carolina” with Alan Cameron, NC Wildlife Resources Volunteer
     Alan Cameron in a long time volunteer with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources and a member of the Friends of DuPont Forest.  He was the presenter for our popular “Wildlife in Transylvania County” series in 2017 featuring Critter Cameras used in DuPont State Forest.
Cameron will discuss the seven varieties of skunks worldwide and feature the Eastern Spotted Skunks.  His game camera pictures of the Eastern Spotted Skunk in Henderson County are the first recorded there.  He has had great success photographing them in DuPont State Forest during the past year.